Tritton AX 720 Gaming Headset Review

The Tritton AX 720 gaming headset is a 7.1 surround sound headset that features immersive 3D directional audio, separate game and voice controls, as well as deep bass and crisp highs. Based on the description, the Tritton AX 720 should prove to be absolutely brilliant and well worth the £130 price tag. Let’s find out…

Upon removing the headset from the box, it soon becomes apparent that the Tritton AX 720 means business.  As well as a detachable microphone and an in-line audio controller, the AX 720 comes with a separate decoder box for the various connections that are supported; including PS3, Xbox 360, PC and Mac.

You receive a range of different accessories with the Tritton AX 720, seen as though it’s compatible with quite a few platforms.

Included in the box:

  • 7.1 Surround Headset
  • Digital Decoder Box with Stand
  • In-Line Audio Controller
  • Removable Microphone
  • Headset Connector Cable
  • Optical Cable
  • USB Cable
  • Digital Audio Adapter
  • PC Adapter

The headset itself is coloured white and made from plastic, but has that sturdy and well-made feel to it.

Each ear piece sports the Tritton logo and has the typical adjust-ability.  The earpieces fit around the ears, rather than over them and have just the right amount of padding so that they sit comfortably.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The microphone is detachable rather than being typically fixed to the headset, which I found to be a great feature because the microphone doesn’t get in the way when not in use.

The in-line audio controller has separate volume controls for the microphone and headset.  Also featured on the audio controller is the connection for the Xbox 360 Controller and microphone mute switch.

The ear pieces are well padded, but it does seem to weigh a lot for a set of headphones, but we shall see how that affects the experience.

The decoder box is for use with the optical cables, presuming you have a port on your audio card to use an optical cable.

The decoder box features an on / off button, which also doubles up as the volume knob. To the right, you’ve got the various LEDs, which indicate the setting that the headset is on. There’s also the port to connect the headphones to as well.

Moving around the sides, you’ve also got the optical port and USB port, for hooking the decoder up to your PC. The underside of the decoder features four rubber feet as well, if you didn’t want to use the included stand.